Author Topic: "Frameless" plexiglass displays  (Read 394 times)

Offline splinter

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"Frameless" plexiglass displays
« on: January 25, 2021, 02:23:27 PM »
I have four locations to display 'full size' posters in my office and I'd like to get frames that allow me to swap out the posters occasionally. I'd prefer plexiglass to protect against visitor curiosity and inevitable mishaps.

I've seen the recommendations for Spotlight Displays for this purpose, however I have a variety of poster sizes I'd like swap in and out of the frames. I donít think a single Spotlight frame would show all the differing sizes well.

I'm considering sandwiching the posters between 1/4" inch acrylic sheets cut larger than the largest image I might display.  I would t-hinge the poster near the top with proper archival tape. No frame around the acrylic, just rails or clips on the sides. The poster is held in place by the hinge and the weight of the plexiglass.  The whole thing is then hung on permanently mounted wall posts (like a picture rail).  It can be easily lifted and removed when needed.

Apart from aesthetic objections to seeing the tape and the edges of the posters, are there any obvious problems with this solution?  Essentially I think itís like a Spotlight Display without the actual frame.

Thoughts?
« Last Edit: January 25, 2021, 02:37:49 PM by splinter »

Offline Neo

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Re: "Frameless" plexiglass displays
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2021, 02:31:44 PM »
I have four locations to display 'full size' posters in my office and I'd like to get frames that allow me to swap out the posters occasionally. I'd prefer plexiglass to protect against visitor curiosity and inevitable mishaps.

I've seen the recommendations for Spotlight Displays for this purpose, however I have a variety of poster sizes I'd like swap in and out of the frames. I donít think a single Spotlight frame would show all the differing sizes well.

I'm considering sandwiching the posters between 1/4" inch acrylic sheets cut larger than the largest image I might display.  I would t-hinge the poster near the top with proper archival tape. No frame around the acrylic, just rails or clips on the sides. The poster is held in place by the hinge and the weight of the plexiglass.  The whole thing is then hung on permanently mounted wall posts (like a picture rail).  It can be easily lifted and removed when needed.

Apart from aesthetic objections to seeing the tape and the edges of the posters, are there any obvious problems with this solution?  Essentially I think itís like a Spotlight Display without the actual frame.

Thoughts?


Sounds like an interesting idea.

Most folks here would recommend archival methods such as no tape, among a few other things.

With humidity, pressure, heat, etc. it's best to not have the piece "sandwiched." High level museum framed stuff is not touching the glass or acrylic at all.

Assuming you're not displaying the Mona Lisa or something similar, the "floating" acrylic frame is a cool, modern look.  Via the DIY route, making the floating frame is probably easier said than done, but looks like it's not too difficult.  There are some good instructions online if you Google "diy floating acrylic frame" such as this one https://abeautifulmess.com/floating-acrylic-frame-diy/  I'm sure there are also places that would make them with their hardware and stuff, to whatever size you want.  It would be great to see how they turn out if you end up making or buying them.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2021, 02:42:30 PM by Neo »

Offline splinter

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Re: "Frameless" plexiglass displays
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2021, 10:44:06 AM »
Thanks for the reply on this.

Agreed the idea is easier said than done, I have a tendency to design stuff that way.  I think its possible though if I decide to go through with it.

About not having the image 'sandwiched', I'm a bit confused.  Many of the storage and display products I've seen mentioned around here seem to advocate for it.  I'm thinking of mylar bags, polyethylene bags, and frames from Hollywood Poster Frames or Spotlight Displays.  They all have the image pressed against a surface. Hollywood Poster Frames goes out of the way in their FAQ 2 to indicate its not a problem as long the appropriate plexiglass is used.

If the issue is breathability or expansion I think having the sides open will accommodate that.

Am I missing something else?

Also, I just discovered that Spotlight Displays is about 20 minutes away from where I live.  Im definitely going to talk with them about possible options for this.

Offline Neo

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Re: "Frameless" plexiglass displays
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2021, 03:48:12 PM »
Thanks for the reply on this.

Agreed the idea is easier said than done, I have a tendency to design stuff that way.  I think its possible though if I decide to go through with it.

About not having the image 'sandwiched', I'm a bit confused.  Many of the storage and display products I've seen mentioned around here seem to advocate for it.  I'm thinking of mylar bags, polyethylene bags, and frames from Hollywood Poster Frames or Spotlight Displays.  They all have the image pressed against a surface. Hollywood Poster Frames goes out of the way in their FAQ 2 to indicate its not a problem as long the appropriate plexiglass is used.

If the issue is breathability or expansion I think having the sides open will accommodate that.

Am I missing something else?

Also, I just discovered that Spotlight Displays is about 20 minutes away from where I live.  Im definitely going to talk with them about possible options for this.

Everyone is somewhere on the spectrum of conservation.  Spotlight and Hollywood frames are good, they're just not at the highest, museum end of the spectrum.

It's about air circulation.  When there's no space to breathe, the changing temperature and humidity will cause ripples, buckling, mold, etc., for the artwork and the frame materials. 

The artwork could also become glued to the acrylic/glass, over time.  I live in Florida with extreme humidity and have only had this happen on stuff I left in a place that was not climate-controlled.  Although with some artwork, I'm sure that there would be issues even if it were in a climate-controlled space.

Even without a frame, there won't be enough space to expand/contract, being sandwiched like that, although it may not be at the extreme end of the above issues. 

High end archival work is matted, with archival hinges. https://www.usaoncanvas.com/include/guide_conservation_framing.php
« Last Edit: January 28, 2021, 03:51:42 PM by Neo »