Author Topic: Stills - The Official Thread (Acquisitions, Authentication, General Advice)  (Read 8486 times)

Charlie

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Based on Louie's advice I am starting this Official Stills Thread for posts about stills.

My biggest questions are:

How do you tell and Original vs. Fake?

What are the different types?

How important is condition? Snipe?

What does the back of a still say about it?

Sets; are there sets?

Surface sheen, what does that say about age?



Offline paul waines

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I'm not sure there are fakes as such, just copies of the Originals. You can also get modern stills taken from the original negative, which is a first printing, just not of the time the negative was taken...

This may well get very complicated...  So lets post some stills... :D

 
It's more than a Hobby...

Through the Stones

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This could get pretty deep into some investigative work... looking forward to this thread!

Offline paul waines

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I'm hoping it's only stills we own...?
It's more than a Hobby...

Offline MoviePosterBid.com

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Charlie, these questions would need a lot of discussion.. it isn't easy describing in all cases and you have to learn by handling them

one question: are there sets?

yes, there are. each film has a key set. they are identifiable in order by the numbers in the lower right or left corner

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Offline Louie D.

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I collect mainly stills from the 20's and 30's so it's fairly easy to tell reprints of those. The paper is different, reprints are usually a lot glossier, the weight of the print may be different, and since the the negatives don't usually exist for these, they are usually printed from copy negatives (someone who shot a picture of the original still and makes a negative from that to make prints) which can be a bit softer and are usually cropped.  Snipes (the little paper on the back) are usually a good indicator the still is original, I haven't seen too many fakes of those but they are usually pretty easy to notice as the paper they usually used was a cheap, course paper, not like the ones you would put in your inkjet. I also have many photos which have handwritten dates and stamps  on them.

Once you get into the 40's and beyond, you're on your own. 

Offline Louie D.

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I'll start off here. This one is from the lost 1930 Fox feature "Her Golden Calf". Pictured are Jack Mulhall kissing Sue Carol:


Offline Louie D.

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Publicity photo of Joan Blondell hanging out in a barn.


Offline erik1925

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I'll start off here. This one is from the lost 1930 Fox feature "Her Golden Calf". Pictured are Jack Mulhall kissing Sue Carol:



Beautiful, Louie. And what a great image. That set is amazing!  bed1



-Jeff

Offline Louie D.

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Beautiful, Louie. And what a great image. That set is amazing!  bed1

Yup, they don't make 'em like that anymore!

Offline Louie D.

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Here's an original publicity negative from 1924's Lon Chaney film, "He Who Gets Slapped":


Offline Louie D.

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Mary Duncan from the lost 1928 F.W. Murnau feature "4 Devils":


Offline erik1925

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Louie, when you call this a an original negative, you mean that this photo was made from the original neg?

And this is another winner! Anything Chaney is my cup o' tea!   thumbup


-Jeff

Offline Louie D.

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Louie, when you call this a an original negative, you mean that this photo was made from the original neg?

And this is another winner! Anything Chaney is my cup o' tea!   thumbup

No, this is a scan of the original negative. Never made a print off of it.

Bruce

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Here are 30,000 (counting groups as one), to get y'all started. Some mighty fine ones included!

http://www.emovieposter.com/agallery/search/STILL/type/8x10/archive.html

This one sold for $855:


Offline Zorba

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Those are sweet louie. I only have three but that was more of a budget choice. I think they are very cool so I avoid them.  :P

Anyway, my three. Starting with the one I make use of every day. Yes I bought them all from Bruce. Once again, thanks for the pics!  8)









tstatum

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I will only buy Cool Hand Luke or The Hustler Still if I dug in any further it could get out of control real quick.

Offline kovacs01

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here are the only stills I have.........

A full??? set of Japanese stills from たそがれ 清兵衛 (The Twilight Samurai).  I will collect anything Yamada, especially from this film.

Schan
Thanks.  You know what you did.
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Offline TheAnswerMVP2001

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Here's a few from Book III of my Marisa Mell collection.  Begin work on Book IV soon which will be the largest photo album dimension wise.






Offline Louie D.

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Fifi D'orsay and Will Rogers from 1931's "As Young As You Feel":


Offline Louie D.

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Mary Pickford from 1927's "My Best Girl":


Offline Louie D.

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Edwards Woods getting a little TOO frisky with Joan Blondell from 1931's "The Public Enemy":


Offline Louie D.

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Wheeler and Woolsey checking it out in 1933's "Diplomaniacs":


Offline Louie D.

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The only original Marylin I own  :-\


Offline Louie D.

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James Cagney throwing Mae Clarke out of his room in 1933's "Lady Killer":